Fandomfare Gaming  The electronic systems used to play video games are known as platforms; in addition to general-purpose computers like a laptop/desktop being used, there are devices created exclusively for the playing of video games.

Fandomfare Gaming 

Gaming at a glance

 

Fandomfare Gaming  The electronic systems used to play video games are known as platforms; in addition to general-purpose computers like a laptop/desktop being used, there are devices created exclusively for the playing of video games. Platforms range from large mainframe computers to small handheld computing devices. Video games are developed for specific platforms; for example, a video game that is available to Steam may not be available to Xbox One. Specialized video games such as arcade games, in which the video game components are housed in a large, typically coin-operated chassis, while common in the 1980s in video arcades, have gradually declined due to the widespread availability of affordable home video game consoles (e.g., PlayStation 4, Xbox One and Nintendo Switch) and video games on desktop/laptops and smartphones.

The input device used for games, the game controller, varies across platforms. Common controllers include gamepads, joysticks, mouse devices, keyboards, the touchscreens of mobile devices, or even a person’s body, using a Kinect sensor. Players view the game on a display device such as a television or computer monitor or sometimes on virtual reality head-mounted display goggles. There are often game sound effects, music and voice actor lines which come from loudspeakers or headphones. Some games in the 2000s include haptic, vibration-creating effects, force feedback peripherals and virtual reality headsets.

Fandomfare Gaming  Esports at a glance

eSports (also known as electronic sports, esports, e-sports, competitive

gaming, or pro gaming) are a form of competition using video games. Most commonly, eSports take the form of organized, multiplayer video game competitions, particularly between professional players. The most common video game genres associated with eSports are real-time strategy (RTS), first-person shooter (FPS), fighting, and multiplayer online battle arena (MOBA). Tournaments such as the League of Legends World Championship, The International, the Evolution Championship Series and the Intel Extreme Masters provide live broadcasts of the competition, and prize money to competitors.

Although organized online and offline competitions have long been a part of video game culture, these were largely between amateurs until the late 2000s when participation by professional gamers and spectatorship in these events saw a large surge in popularity.[2] Many game developers now actively design toward a professional eSport subculture.

The genre of fighting games and arcade game fighters have also been popular in amateur[citation needed] tournaments, although the fighting game community has often distanced themselves from the eSports label.[3] In the mid-2010s, the most successful titles featured in professional competition were the multiplayer online battle arena (MOBA) games League of Legends and Dota 2, and the first person shooter game Counter-Strike: Global Offensive. Other games with significant earnings include Call of Duty, Heroes of the Storm, Hearthstone, Overwatch, Smite and StarCraft II.

 

Crypto at a glance 

Fandomfare Gaming A cryptocurrency (or crypto currency) is digital asset designed to work as a medium of exchange that uses strong cryptography to secure financial transactions, control the creation of additional units, and verify the transfer of assets. Cryptocurrency is a kind of digital currency, virtual currency or alternative currency. Cryptocurrencies use decentralized control as opposed to centralized electronic money and central banking systems The decentralized control of each cryptocurrency works through distributed ledger technology, typically a blockchain, that serves as a public financial transaction database.

Bitcoin, first released as open-source software in 2009, is generally considered the first decentralized cryptocurrency. Since then, over 4,000 altcoin (alternative coin) variants of bitcoin have been created.