Kaspersky: Cryptocurrency Scammers Stole $2.3 Million in Q2

Cryptocurrency Scammers There were almost 60,000 attempts to visit fraudulent web pages featuring popular crypto-currency wallets and exchanges from April to June 2018.

Cryptocurrency Scammers There were almost 60,000 attempts to visit fraudulent web pages featuring popular crypto-currency wallets and exchanges from April to June 2018.
Fake ICO project pages: the first is located on fantom.pub and imitates fantom.foundation, the real site of the FANTOM project; the second one, found on sparkster.be, is an imitation of sparkster.me, the original SPARKSTER site
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FANDOMFARE GAMING Cryptocurrency Scammers There were almost 60,000 attempts to visit fraudulent web pages featuring popular crypto-currency wallets and exchanges from April to June 2018. In addition to traditional phishing, which helps access victim accounts and private key information, cybercriminals try to force their victims to independently transfer crypto-currency to them. One of the tactics is free distribution of the crypto-currency, while another is for scammers to exploit the names of new ICO projects to raise funds from potential investors. Using these two tricks, Kaspersky Lab estimates that intruders earned more than $2.3 million, even without taking into account any revenues from classic phishing schemes.

“The permanence of attacks targeting financial organizations reflects the fact that more and more people are using electronic money,” said Nadezhda Demidova, lead web content analyst, Kaspersky Lab. “Still, not all of them are sufficiently aware of the possible risks, so intruders are actively trying to steal sensitive information through phishing.”Read More Kaspersky Lab in Q2 2018

Cryptocurrency Scammers

Cryptocurrency Scammers In the second quarter, our antiphishing system prevented 58,000 user attempts to connect to phishing websites masquerading as popular cryptocurrency wallets and markets. In addition to classic phishing, which aims at gaining access to the victim’s accounts and private key information, cybercriminals try every way to entice a victim to willingly send them cryptocurrency. One of the examples of this are cryptocoin giveaways. Cybercriminals continue using the names of new ICO projects to collect money from potential investors that are trying to gain early access to new tokens. Sometimes phishing sites pop up before official project sites.

Ethereum (ETH) is currently the most popular cryptocurrency with phishers. The popularity of Ethereum with cybercriminals increases as more funds are attracted by ICOs on the Ethereum platform. According to our very rough estimate (based on data received from over a thousand ETH wallets used by malefactors), over the Q2 2018, cybercriminals exploiting ICOs managed to make $2,329,317 (end-of-July-2018 exchange rate), traditional phishing not included.

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